Our Aim

Oxford RiskOur second sustainable investment research study, created and conducted by behavioral finance experts Oxford Risk and fielded by Research Now, builds upon research we launched in the spring of 2019, which examined US investors’ understanding of and interest in sustainable investment.

Who Did We Survey?

2020 Survey Respondents 1000 indivuduals 18 to over 90 age range 50-50 male female split From $40k to over $4m of househild investable assets

Key Findings

Millennials vs. boomers

86%

of younger adults (39 and under) are interested in sustainable investing, compared with 70% of older adults (over the age of 50).

Active engagement is key

29%

of US investors would prefer their fund managers to actively engage with management of unsustainable companies than to simply invest in sustainable companies.

E before S and G

39%

of US investors said they were most concerned about environmental issues, compared with just 28% stating social issues and 23% selecting governance concerns. This interest runs counter to where much of the asset-management industry has historically been focused – on governance.

Survey Preference: Sustainable!

  • Bridging the gap

Responsible Investment

Our commitment to responsible investment is embedded deep in our heritage. We have been proxy voting since the 1970s, and have had responsible investment analysts since the 1990s – long before it became mainstream to do so.

We integrate environmental, social and governance (ESG) research in our security selection process across all investment strategies, as we believe that taking ESG factors into account can lead to better investment decisions. This applies not only to equities, but also in a fixed-income context.

By taking a proactive approach to engagement, we can work with the companies we invest in to increase the sustainability of their businesses over time.

Additionally, we offer a suite of sustainable strategies, which build on the integrated process by targeting a dual outcome of investment returns and positive societal outcomes.

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